Secret Arrows: A Full Quiver – Part 5

(Click here to search for all the posts in this series…)

Psalm 11:2 For look! The wicked bend their bow, They make ready their arrow on the string, That they may shoot secretly at the upright in heart. (NKJV)

It is part of the human experience to be attacked by someone else. It is even more a part of Christianity to be persecuted further simply for loving Jesus. Our fleshly response is to be defensive or to retaliate.

There are many different reasons why the attacks happen, either by unbelievers or fellow Christians. The mature Christian will learn to discern these motives and respond accordingly. Very often, the attacker is hurting, stressed, confused or misled. Now, that’s not to say that there aren’t times when the attacks are just simply evil being played out. Most certainly that happens routinely but sometimes, I’d even say in my experience, MOST of the time, there are circumstances behind the motives that open a door of ministry for us.

What separates Christians from the world is that even when we are attacked we do not seek revenge or stoop to retaliation. Don’t let this be confused with defending our families, employer or friends. When attacks on us (and those around us) result in our unselfish and sacrificial defense of others, that is a good thing. But how should we personally respond, feel and act ourselves concerning the wicked person attacking us? So far we’ve looked at:

  • The real motive behind the attack on us: hurt
  • Our response as Christians towards them: sympathy

    Sometimes people lash out at us because of hurt in their own life.
    Empowered by the Holy Spirit we can actually have sympathy rather than anger because we understand that this hurting person has no access to the only Person who can truly heal their pain. Next time someone slings an arrow at you, look carefully for signs that this person might be reacting to hurt in their own lives without the Great Physician to heal them.

  • The real motive behind the attack on us: stress
  • Our response as Christians towards them: serving

    Stress from work, family, church or health can cause people to respond in the most bizarre and abnormal ways. We live in a stressful world, in stressful times. When someone attacks us while they are under great stress, I believe the most effective Christian response is to serve them. Help them alleviate the stress. This may open the door of their heart so that you can share with them the ultimate stress relief.


  • The real motive behind the attack on us: immaturity or ignorance
  • Our response as Christians towards them: patience

    At times we are attacked by those who are plain and simply immature. Their immaturity may be emotional, spiritual or relational but all typical result in a hair trigger character that is quick to attack others. When someone lacks maturity, the easiest way to cover it up or avoid admitting it is to attack anyone or anything that it doesn’t understand or that challenges the immaturity. Their is no other response for this type of person other than patience. Maturity comes with time and patience. As Christians, we may be the only people who will ever have the understanding and willingness to help a person mature.

The quiver is full when it comes to reasons that the arrows of the wicked fly against the righteous. This by no means an exhaustive list, but let’s take a look at a few more and we’ll wrap up this series.

A Few More In the Quiver

  • The real motive behind the attack on us: competitiveness
  • Our response as Christians towards them: understanding

    Occasionally we are attacked by someone who is simply competing with us for something: time, attention, recognition, acceptance. By responding with understanding we can demonstrate to these types of people that you can compete and achieve without attacking or hurting other people. Be an example of someone who does not respond in revenge, but can work hard, be succesful and do your very best while not be threatened that someone else may do better. Show them through your response that healthy competition with love is good thing while competition to find meaning or value in life is not, especially when it turns ugly.
    Note: some folks claim all competition is bad, that it doesn’t not demonstrate servant-mindedness. I would disagree. That’s like saying a true Christian could never win the 100 meter relay or improve his products and services because it is not putting the other guy first. Competition, done right, helps us to grow, be better, and reach beyond our comfort zone. It most certainly can be done with love, humility and a servant’s heart. Competition by a Christian demonstrates the true nature of giving your very best effort while maintaining an attitude of love, self-control, humilty and concern for all involved.
  • The real motive behind the attack on us: envy
  • Our response as Christians towards them: compassion

    Attacks often stem from envy. Envy comes from a lack of contentment. Contentment is impossible without God. When you face attacks from someone that is plainly envious (of your good marriage, your joy in life, your contentment, your peace, etc.) the proper response is compassion. Everyone wants these things but the vast majority of the whole is not looking in the right place – or should I say the right Person. Even if the motive is something as clearly wrong as envy based in greed or covetousness, it still originates in a wayward heart that is focused on things that will never make them happy. Rather than retaliating or being angry at your envious attacker, stop and think about the fact that they will NEVER be happy in life the way they are headed. If you cannot find compassion for someone that you know is headed for a lifetime of misery, then perhaps it’s your own heart that needs a little work.

  • The real motive behind the attack on us: peer pressure
  • Our response as Christians towards them: kindness

    Following the crowd often results in joining in an attack that we may not have otherwise suffered. Peer pressure is a powerful influence life whether good or bad (we Christians could stand to be a little less wishy-washy and employ a little more Godly peer pressure to each other). When you are attacked by someone who is clearly “going with the flow” wait for your opportunity to respond individually to them in kindness. Perhaps through your response, their heart will be open to God.

  • The real motive behind the attack on us: guilt
  • Our response as Christians towards them: forgiveness

    They are shacking up and miserable; you have a great marriage. They are sour and unhappy; you are joyful and content. Their kids are defiant and untameable; your kids are respectful and obedient. Their life is filled with vices; your life is wholesome and stable. They are cheating, committing adultery, lying and being lazy; you are honest, hard working and faithful.

    It is common to be attacked by someone whose life has gone wrong, and they know it (or sense it). Guilt may be the strongest motivator of behavior and attitude that humans face. Often these attacks will come in the form of accusations or attempts to characterize your parenting methods, marriage roles or honesty as something bad. “You spank your kids, that’s abusive.” “Being submissive to your husband is allowing him to run over you.” “You’re just kissing up to the boss by looking like you work hard.”

    The examples could go on and on. When sin is exposed with righteousness, the response is often to attack the righteous as being “judgmental” or “holier than thou”. This is to be expected and knowing this tendency, it will be easier for you to respond with forgiveness and compassion towards the attacker.

    They need what only Christians have in salvation: peace, comfort, stability, standards, acceptance, hope and a clear conscience. The next time someone attacks you because your life clearly causes them guilt about theirs, respond to them with instant and genuine forgiveness. Maybe through your response, they will see the value of the life you have chosen and become open to wanting to learn more about it.
  • The real motive behind the attack on us: evil
  • Our response as Christians towards them: love

    This one is probably the hardest but stems from a direct command to love your enemies (Matt 5.44). Sometime people attack us simply because they are “on the other side” playing for the dark spiritual forces squad (Eph 6.12). There are times when we are attacked by the wicked for the simple reason that they are wicked. God has called us to respond in love so that if possible, their hearts will be pierced and perhaps they may turn in shame and repentance to a merciful God.

    Of course we could categorize all unbelievers as “the wicked” but for the sake of this lesson, sometimes our wicked choices and behavior stem from other character flaws or circumstances. Yes, wickedness is wickedness in whatever form is takes, but I’ve seen the difference between someone who attacks for the sheer wicked pleasure of it, and someone who attacks from stress, pain or ignorance. When the purely evil attacker comes calling, our duty is to love them through Christ who strengthens us.

It’s easy to get mad and feel angry when attacked. This is a NATURAL response. As Christians we should grow past the natural, fleshly response and begin to develop a spiritual, supernatural response. This not only helps you minister to the attacker and show Christ’s love to them, but also allows the Christian to avoid a vast amount of stress, anger, bitterness and frustration.

Responding in love not only ministers to the lost,
but allows the Christian to avoid unneeded stress,
anger and frustration when being attacked.

This point should not be quickly passed by. Think of the last time you spent several hours, days, weeks or even years being mad at someone who wickedly attacked you. How much good did your anger do? Who was really hurt by it? You, or them? How much blessing could there have been if you would have looked in patience, sympathy or compassion at your attacker rather than anger or defensiveness? What affect on their life did you miss out on? How much maturing did you forfeit by holding on to being offended?

It won’t be long before you will be attacked in some way. Many of you will be attacked by friends or co-workers. Countless others will be attacked by family members. Sadly, not a small number will be attacked by professing Christians.

How will you respond?

Psalm 11:7 For the Lord is righteous, He loves righteousness; His countenance beholds the upright. (NKJV)

Will you respond in righteousness despite the hurt? Will you trust the Lord to bless you, defend you and see you through if you choose to minister to your attacker rather than retaliate?

Lord God, help us to respond in righteousness to those who attack us. Help us to respond in such a way that our attackers clearly see their need for You. In Jesus’ Name, Amen.

Contemplation: Do you understand why responding in righteousness allows us to avoid much unneeded stress and frustration in our own life? When you respond in anger or defensiveness, who does it really affect? Is God glorified by our compassion or our retaliation? Is God capable of defending your reputation? Do you expect a wicked person to be able to act any other way? How will they ever change if you don’t show them a different way?

Application: To be able to respond in love and compassion to an attacker takes a willful decision AHEAD of time. Rarely are we ready to respond instinctively with patience and understanding if we simply react to an attacker. We must decide proactive NOW to respond in love THEN. We can save ourselves so much stress and aggravation if we respond in righteousness to those who attack us rather than respond through our flesh with revenge and defensiveness.

James 1:22 – But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves. (NKJV)

  1. What is the most obvious Bible truth you have learned today?
  2. What change in your life needs to be made concerning this truth?
  3. What specific thing will you do today to begin that change?



(seriesid:44)


Secret Arrows: Immaturity & Patience – Part 4

(Click here to search for all the posts in this series…)

Psalm 11:2 For look! The wicked bend their bow, They make ready their arrow on the string, That they may shoot secretly at the upright in heart. (NKJV)

It is part of the human experience to be attacked by someone else. It is even more a part of Christianity to be persecuted further simply for loving Jesus. Our fleshly response is to be defensive or to retaliate.

There are many different reasons why the attacks happen, either by unbelievers or fellow Christians. The mature Christian will learn to discern these motives and respond accordingly. Very often, the attacker is hurting, stressed, confused or misled. Now, that’s not to say that there aren’t times when the attacks are just simply evil being played out. Most certainly that happens routinely but sometimes, I’d even say in my experience, MOST of the time, there are circumstances behind the motives that open a door of ministry for us.

What separates Christians from the world is that even when we are attacked we do not seek revenge or stoop to retaliation. Don’t let this be confused with defending our families, employer or friends. When attacks on us (and those around us) result in our unselfish and sacrificial defense of others, that is a good thing. But how should we personally respond, feel and act ourselves concerning the wicked person attacking us? So far we’ve looked at:

  • The real motive behind the attack on us: hurt
  • Our response as Christians towards them: sympathy

    Sometimes people lash out at us because of hurt in their own life.
    Empowered by the Holy Spirit we can actually have sympathy rather than anger because we understand that this hurting person has no access to the only Person who can truly heal their pain. Next time someone slings an arrow at you, look carefully for signs that this person might be reacting to hurt in their own lives without the Great Physician to heal them.

  • The real motive behind the attack on us: stress
  • Our response as Christians towards them: serving

    Stress from work, family, church or health can cause people to respond in the most bizarre and abnormal ways. We live in a stressful world, in stressful times. When someone attacks us while they are under great stress, I believe the most effective Christian response is to serve them. Help them alleviate the stress. This may open the door of their heart so that you can share with them the ultimate stress relief.

Immaturity & Patience

Personal attacks based on immaturity can come from many bases: emotional immaturity, life immaturity, spiritual immaturity or immature Biblical knowledge. Since any of these can be simply because of “youth”, we will discuss them assuming adulthood.

Emotional immaturity can be from, among other things, inconsistent spiritual discipline, poor upbringing or surrounding yourself with other emotionally immature people. These types of people often attack others because their primary concern is self: self-defense, self-interest, self-promotion and self-preservation. Any threat to “self” often evokes an attack whether deserved or not, and given that the starting point is from emotional immaturity, usually the attacks themselves are immature: gossip, lies, name-calling and irrationality.

Immaturity about life in general can be more subtle and is not easily defined. It can come from circumstances such as the “silver spoon” syndrome, where over-affluence has skewed a person’s perspective on life. It might come from a “sheltered life” where a person just has not been exposed to many hardships or difficult situations. Sometimes it can be manifested because of the “bed of roses” situation where a person has just had, for whatever reason, a pretty easy life, void of many difficulties or tests. Maybe the most common source of “life immaturity” is our pleasure-centric society that churns out multitudes of young “adults” in their mid to late twenties and early thirties who have done nothing much but learn how to take tests, use credit cards, short-change the employer, party, be entertained and indulge in various forms of pleasure.

Spiritual immaturity is the product of a weak, inconsistent or misled spiritual life. The misled spiritual life may actually practice quite a bit of discipline, but if it is not discipline that draws one to the true God of Heaven, then it is not just neutral, it is destructive. The weak and inconsistent spiritual life stem from two main problems: carnality and worldliness. Closely related, they emphasize two aspects of sinful man: following your fleshly appetites and indulging them with things of this temporal world.

Closely tied to that, and often the cause of spiritual immaturity is Biblical immaturity. This is simply the lack of Biblical knowledge and/or the application of it to your life. In some aspects, a lot of people enjoy an all-time HIGH level of Biblical knowledge thanks to all the resources available but employ an all-time LOW amount of it to their lives.

In some ways, Bible knowledge is at an all-time HIGH,
while the application of it is at an all-time LOW.

There are many other sources and reasons for immaturity but they all result in a form of ignorance. You see, once a person KNOWS how to act or respond and they don’t, then we are not talking about immaturity…. now we’re talking about malice or deliberate deception. If a person slings the arrows of attack knowing full well what they are doing, rather than acting from a position (though still wrong) of immaturity (ignorance in whatever form), then it is a whole different matter to consider. So how should we respond to the truly immature? It’s probably the easiest to respond to of all the reasons we are studying. Patience….

How can a Christian help but respond to personal
attacks with loving patience when it comes
from the truly immature or ignorant?

Patience. It’s easy to explain by using our children as an example. When our immature children act out, act up or make bad choices based in obvious immaturity, what is our response? Patience, teaching, guidance, direction. Yes, there may be consequences or discipline involved but the root objective is to help them mature in whatever form our response is manifested.

Take for example the always fun and common “arrow” that is often shot at parents by adolescents or teenagers: “I hate you!” Some parents are lucky enough to hear it said directly to them, but often it’s said from one child to another about the parent. It doesn’t feel good at all to hear it, but any good parent recognizes that this attack comes from immaturity (the vast majority of the time). Take this same concept and understand that personal attacks based in immaturity are not much more than “childishness” wrapped in adult technique or sophistication.

Of course you don’t want to haul off and call the other person a “child” nor do you even want to hold that condescending assessment privately. Understanding immaturity as the source requires us to be patient in response and assumes that we are more interested in the other person’s growth than we are about our own precious feelings or reputation. If you can relate and understand that children or youths sometimes engage in hurtful attacks because of immaturity, then you can understand that immature adults have simply grown physically but not emotionally or spiritually.

What does the patience response look like? First and foremost is starts with calm forgiveness, a real interest in the personal growth of the attacker, and foundational priority that God’s glory is more important than avenging our feelings.

The patient response tries to determine the source or type of immaturity and hopes to gain a receptive audience with the attacker on the wings of forgiveness and love. It doesn’t always work out that way, for sure, but it will NEVER work out that way if we don’t even try.

Patient forgiveness doesn’t always give a
chance to help our attacker, but you
will NEVER get the chance without it.

Patience is a God-given fruit of the Spirit so every Christian is capable of it:

Galatians 5:22 But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering [patience], kindness, goodness, faithfulness, (NKJV)

Through that patience, you will naturally have the opportunity to show many of the others: kindness, selflessness and love. The alternative is to retaliate or ignore… neither of which has any chance of helping your attacker grow in Christ, or find Christ. So what have you got to lose?

The next time an immature person fires off a few arrows of personal attack at you, secret or otherwise, try responding in patience and see if maybe it will open the door to helping someone grow up. Maturity comes with time and patience. As Christians, we may be the only people who will ever have the understanding and willingness to help a person mature. may be the only people who will ever have the understanding and willingness to help a person mature.

Lord God, help us to respond in righteousness to those who attack us. Help us to respond in such a way that our attackers clearly see their need for You. In Jesus’ Name, Amen.

Contemplation: Do you understand why responding in righteousness allows us to avoid much unneeded stress and frustration in our own life? When you respond in anger or defensiveness, who does it really affect? Is God glorified by our compassion or our retaliation? Is God capable of defending your reputation? Do you expect a wicked person to be able to act any other way? How will they ever change if you don’t show them a different way?

Application: To be able to respond in love and compassion to an attacker takes a willful decision AHEAD of time. Rarely are we ready to respond instinctively with patience and understanding if we simply react to an attacker. We must decide proactive NOW to respond in love THEN. We can save ourselves so much stress and aggravation if we respond in righteousness to those who attack us rather than respond through our flesh with revenge and defensiveness.

James 1:22 – But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves. (NKJV)

  1. What is the most obvious Bible truth you have learned today?
  2. What change in your life needs to be made concerning this truth?
  3. What specific thing will you do today to begin that change?



(seriesid:44)


Secret Arrows: Stress & Serving – Part 3

(Click here to search for all the posts in this series…)

Psalm 11:2 For look! The wicked bend their bow, They make ready their arrow on the string, That they may shoot secretly at the upright in heart. (NKJV)

It is part of the human experience to be attacked by someone else. It is even more a part of Christianity to be persecuted further simply for loving Jesus. Our fleshly response is to be defensive or to retaliate.

There are many different reasons why the attacks happen, either by unbelievers or fellow Christians. The mature Christian will learn to discern these motives and respond accordingly. Very often, the attacker is hurting, stressed, confused or misled. Now, that’s not to say that there aren’t times when the attacks are just simply evil being played out. Most certainly that happens routinely but sometimes, I’d even say in my experience, MOST of the time, there are circumstances behind the motives that open a door of ministry for us.

What separates Christians from the world is that even when we are attacked we do not seek revenge or stoop to retaliation. Don’t let this be confused with defending our families, employer or friends. When attacks on us (and those around us) result in our unselfish and sacrificial defense of others, that is a good thing. But how should we personally respond, feel and act ourselves concerning the wicked person attacking us? So far we’ve looked at:

  • The real motive behind the attack on us: hurt
  • Our response as Christians towards them: sympathy

    Sometimes people lash out at us because of hurt in their own life.
    Empowered by the Holy Spirit we can actually have sympathy rather than anger because we understand that this hurting person has no access to the only Person who can truly heal their pain. Next time someone slings an arrow at you, look carefully for signs that this person might be reacting to hurt in their own lives without the Great Physician to heal them.

Stress & Serving

Stress…. what a powerful influence it has on our behavior. Stress from work, family, church or health can cause people to respond in the most bizarre and abnormal ways. Unbelievers have it even worse because they are dealing with their stress strictly in the flesh, and do not have the Holy Spirit to guide them or comfort them. We live in a stressful world, in stressful times. Western societies, particularly America, has willfully chosen a very hectic and stressful lifestyle.

When someone attacks us while they are under great stress, I believe the most effective Christian response is to serve them. Help them alleviate the stress. This may open the door of their heart so that you can share with them the ultimate stress relief.

It takes a heaping helping of forgiveness to
serve your attack rather than retaliate.

Of course this requires a heaping helping of forgiveness too because the pain of being attacked doesn’t simply disappear. I will tell you this though: the pain disappears alot quicker when you are concerned about the eternal welfare of your attacker rather than wallowing in your mistreatment.

The anger, despair or anxiousness that comes from stress can be indicated by a troubled spirit, resentment, fear or worry. There are many symptoms of stress but the caring compassionate Christian can learn to recognize them and see past the bad behavior to a hurting and needy heart.

How can you serve them? If they are suffering, offering to do something to help alleviate the suffering or comfort them. If they have been through a tragedy or great trouble, think of some tangible way to serve them or be a blessing (make a meal, babysit, mow the grass, etc.). If they are truly having financial stress offer to help with either financial guidance or assistance. Of course there is always the possibility they will tell you to stay out of their business. In that case you can continue to pray for them, and be ready if the time comes when you can serve them.

If the opportunity presents itself, here are some verses you can share: Faith (Rom. 14:23); God’s grace (II Cor. 3:5; 12:9); God’s provision (Lk. 22:42); God’s sufficiency (Matt. 11:28; Heb. 4:4-11); Rejoicing (James 1:2; I Peter 1:6); Peace (Jn. 14:27; II Pet. 1:2); Contentment (II Cor. 12:10; Phil. 4:11-13).

There are no comprehensive lists or solutions. You just have to ask God to show you what the stress is, and how you can serve. Tomorrow we’ll look at attacks coming from immature or untaught people.

Lord God, help us to respond in righteousness to those who attack us. Help us to respond in such a way that our attackers clearly see their need for You. In Jesus’ Name, Amen.

Contemplation: Do you understand why responding in righteousness allows us to avoid much unneeded stress and frustration in our own life? When you respond in anger or defensiveness, who does it really affect? Is God glorified by our compassion or our retaliation? Is God capable of defending your reputation? Do you expect a wicked person to be able to act any other way? How will they ever change if you don’t show them a different way?

Application: To be able to respond in love and compassion to an attacker takes a willful decision AHEAD of time. Rarely are we ready to respond instinctively with patience and understanding if we simply react to an attacker. We must decide proactive NOW to respond in love THEN. We can save ourselves so much stress and aggravation if we respond in righteousness to those who attack us rather than respond through our flesh with revenge and defensiveness.

James 1:22 – But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves. (NKJV)

  1. What is the most obvious Bible truth you have learned today?
  2. What change in your life needs to be made concerning this truth?
  3. What specific thing will you do today to begin that change?



(seriesid:44)


Secret Arrows: Hurt & Sympathy – Part 2

(Click here to search for all the posts in this series…)

Psalm 11:2 For look! The wicked bend their bow, They make ready their arrow on the string, That they may shoot secretly at the upright in heart. (NKJV)

It is part of the human experience to be attacked by someone else. It is even more a part of Christianity to be persecuted further simply for loving Jesus. Our fleshly response is to be defensive or to retaliate.

There are many different reasons why the attacks happen, either by unbelievers or fellow Christians. The mature Christian will learn to discern these motives and respond accordingly. Very often, the attacker is hurting, stressed, confused or misled. Now, that’s not to say that there aren’t times when the attacks are just simply evil being played out. Most certainly that happens routinely but sometimes, I’d even say in my experience, MOST of the time, there are circumstances behind the motives that open a door of ministry for us.

Hurt & Sympathy

Have you ever been attacked by someone you love or someone who is usually kind and it absolutely shocks you? When a person attacks you and it is totally out of their usual behavior, often you will find that they themselves are hurting over something. That doesn’t excuse their actions and it leaves some character work for them to do, but it also opens a door for you to show them understanding and forgiveness.

Being hurt doesn’t excuse the attacker,
but it does give us a chance to minister.

Sometimes people lash out at us because of hurt in their own life. It’s hard to explain why people do this but it’s a pretty common phenomenon. Perhaps it is the distraction, or maybe it’s just frustration being played out without concern for others. When an unbeliever is hurting, they simply do not have the power or resources available to Christians through the Holy Spirit. They have no Comforter, no Counselor, no One to see them through the valley of shadows. When a hurting Christian attacks, it is because they have not availed themselves of the comfort available to them.

Attacks are painful no matter what someone’s motives are but Christians have the unique opportunity to see past the attack and look with sympathy at a person who is lashing out in pain and despair.
Empowered by the Holy Spirit we can actually have sympathy rather than anger because we understand that this hurting person has no access to the only Person who can truly heal their pain.

What is sympathy? Is it pity? Is it being soft towards their sinful behavior? Is it the ability to disregard the pain they’ve caused you?

The word sympathy is a combination of two thoughts that mean “from common feelings or experience”. In other words, it is the ability to understand another person because 1) you’ve been there, or 2) you deliberately put yourself in their shoes, from their perspective, in an effort to “experience” or understand their feelings or circumstances.

Would we react differently if we knew that the reason our co-worker is bad mouthing us is because they are hurting over their spouse cheating on them? Would we retaliate or minister to the person who just cussed you out if you knew one of their children was in total rebellion creating havoc at home? Would we want to punish or reach out to the family member who is attacking us if we knew that secretly they were on the edge of suicide from emotional distress?

It’s very difficult to list a bunch of easy-to-identify reasons or situations that constitute hurt. It’s takes an alert, forgiving and discerning Christian to see past the attack and into the heart. Next time someone slings an arrow at you, look carefully for signs that this person might be reacting to hurt in their own lives without the Great Physician to heal them. Then take that wonderful opportunity to show God’s love and forgiveness and perhaps that person will be drawn to the Lord through your response.

This is a tough part of the Christian character to develop because you have to quit caring about your own well being and your own reputation so much – and that is a monumental task for prideful man. In the end though, does it really matter if someone attacks you? Does it change who you are? Does it change your eternal destiny? Does it change God’s love for you? Does God believe the attacks are true about you? No, no, no and no.

So get past wanting to be vindicated or defend yourself. Look to the greater task of wanting to help your attacker find peace and comfort in the Lord.

Tomorrow we’ll look at attacks coming from stressed out people.

Lord God, help us to respond in righteousness to those who attack us. Help us to respond in such a way that our attackers clearly see their need for You. In Jesus’ Name, Amen.

Contemplation: Do you understand why responding in righteousness allows us to avoid much unneeded stress and frustration in our own life? When you respond in anger or defensiveness, who does it really affect? Is God glorified by our compassion or our retaliation? Is God capable of defending your reputation? Do you expect a wicked person to be able to act any other way? How will they ever change if you don’t show them a different way?

Application: To be able to respond in love and compassion to an attacker takes a willful decision AHEAD of time. Rarely are we ready to respond instinctively with patience and understanding if we simply react to an attacker. We must decide proactive NOW to respond in love THEN. We can save ourselves so much stress and aggravation if we respond in righteousness to those who attack us rather than respond through our flesh with revenge and defensiveness.

James 1:22 – But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves. (NKJV)

  1. What is the most obvious Bible truth you have learned today?
  2. What change in your life needs to be made concerning this truth?
  3. What specific thing will you do today to begin that change?



(seriesid:44)


Secret Arrows – Part 1

(Click here to search for all the posts in this series…)

Psalm 11:2 For look! The wicked bend their bow, They make ready their arrow on the string, That they may shoot secretly at the upright in heart. (NKJV)

If you’ve been alive very long, you know what it’s like to have someone “shoot an arrow” at you. Whether it’s lying about you, accusing you of something, ruining your reputation or gossiping about you, it’s an inevitable part of life. While it certainly comes from those who hate our Lord, sadly, the shots often come attached with the label “Brother”.

When it happens out in the open for all to see, it’s often easier to deal with because most of the time the antagonist is easily recognized. We are not fooled; others are not fooled. It’s a whole different ballgame when “secret” attacks occur. You know the ones I mean don’t you? It’s the person who smiles and acts like nothing is going on when other people are around, but let the games begin as soon as the door shuts and the witnesses have gone home. Or it could be the unseen attacker you can never even identify whose arrows of gossip and lies penetrate just as deeply but leave us with the added uncertainty of unanswered questions.

The fact that people attack each other is a by-product of a sin-cursed world. It will NEVER stop until sin is completely removed no matter how much Oprah or the United Nations wants to preach “the goodness of man”. What I want to think about in this series is 1) why the wicked attack the upright, and 2) what our response to those attacks should be.

Christians should be identifiable by their
supernatural response to personal attacks.

One of the things that separates Christians from the world is that even when we are attacked we do not (or should not) seek revenge or stoop to retaliation. Don’t let this be confused with defending our families, employer or friends. When attacks on us (and those around us) result in our selfless and sacrificial defense of others, that is a good thing. We could use more courage today. But how should we personally respond, feel and act concerning the wicked person attacking us? The natural, fleshly response is defensiveness and retaliation. The mature Christian should move past the natural response and cultivate the supernatural response.

What should our response be? There are not any pat or simple answers, and the exact EXTERNAL response is going to depend on many variables. However, our internal attitude towards those who attack us as Christians is a little more quantifiable. I have found that MUCH stress and frustration can be averted in life if we simply look at the motives, spiritual state and needs of the person attacking us then focus on those internal issues rather than the external battle.

Very often, the attacker is hurting, stressed, confused or misled. Now, that’s not to say that there aren’t times when the attacks are just simply evil being played out. Most certainly that happens routinely. Over the next few days I would like to look at some common motives that drive the wicked archer to launch their arrows at us: hurt, competitiveness, stress, envy, immaturity or ignorance, guilt, peer pressure and evil.

We’ll look at the motive and the Godly response to it. I hope you’ll join me.

Lord God, help us to respond in righteousness to those who attack us. Help us to respond in such a way that our attackers clearly see their need for You. In Jesus’ Name, Amen.

Contemplation: Do you understand why responding in righteousness allows us to avoid much unneeded stress and frustration in our own life? When you respond in anger or defensiveness, who does it really affect? Is God glorified by our compassion or our retaliation? Is God capable of defending your reputation? Do you expect a wicked person to be able to act any other way? How will they ever change if you don’t show them a different way?

Application: To be able to respond in love and compassion to an attacker takes a willful decision AHEAD of time. Rarely are we ready to respond instinctively with patience and understanding if we simply react to an attacker. We must decide proactive NOW to respond in love THEN. We can save ourselves so much stress and aggravation if we respond in righteousness to those who attack us rather than respond through our flesh with revenge and defensiveness.

James 1:22 – But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves. (NKJV)

  1. What is the most obvious Bible truth you have learned today?
  2. What change in your life needs to be made concerning this truth?
  3. What specific thing will you do today to begin that change?



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